Their name, The MC5, reflected their Detroit roots (it was short for “Motor City Five’), was vaguely reminiscent of a sports car name (like the GTO), and echoed the Dave Clark Five, at the peak of their popularity in 1964–1965. In some ways the group was similar to other garage bands of the period, composing soon-to-be historic workouts such as “Black to Comm” during their mid-teens in the basement of the home of Wayne Kramer’s mother. The music also reflected Fred “Sonic” Smith and Kramer’s increasing interest in free jazz — the guitarists were inspired by the likes of Albert Ayler, Archie Shepp, Sun Ra and late period John Coltrane, and tried to imitate the ecstatic sounds of the squealing, high-pitched saxophonists they adored. The MC5 even later opened for a few U.S. midwest shows for Sun Ra, whose influence is obvious in “Starship”. Kramer and Smith were also deeply inspired by Sonny Sharrock, one of the few electric guitarists working in free jazz, and they eventually developed a unique interlocking style that was like little heard before: Kramer’s solos often used a heavy, irregular vibrato, while Smith’s rhythms contained an uncommon explosive energy, including patterns that conveyed great excitement, as evidenced in “Black to Comm” and many other songs.




[Inspired by Jesper Nielsen and Patrick Bird in London – dedicated to Allan Vegenfeldt in Copenhagen and Mogens Toudahl in Berlin]

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